Should You Consider A Career In Investment Banking?

by in Personal Finance on Dec 28th, 2014

New year, new career?

If words such as takeover, IPOs, financial modeling, research, and bridge loans are some of your favorite conversation topics, you might want to consider investment banking as a career option. The same goes if MSNBC and Bloomberg TV are your go-to channels, and you have an addiction watching the red and green flashing lights of tickers go up and down all day long.

Investments banks have played a major role in M&A, underwriting, and raising money for the corporate world. Although investment banking has lost a lot of its pre 2008 luster, it is still difficult to get a job in this notoriously competitive and demanding industry. But at the same time, it is still a lucrative career choice for its most disciplined players. If you want to emerge as a winner in this field, familiarize yourself with the below:

Who Will Offer You An Entry-Level Role In Investment Banking?

If you wish to be a part of this industry that is constantly involved in shaping the destiny of major corporate houses, you have options to join one of the following:

  • Bulge bracket firms consisting of the top investment banks like JP Morgan, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley.
  • Regionally oriented IBs or ones located in the middle market like Jefferies, Lazard or Greenhill.
  • Boutiques or specialized firms oriented towards a specific industry vertical – ex. program trading, bond-trading, technical analysis, or M&A advisory.
  • Merger and Acquisition wing of a large company, like General Electric, as an in house staff member who evaluates strategies for inorganic growth

How Do You Get Into Investment Banking? Read More

Yakezie Member Post – Financegirl

Yakezie 2H2014 Member Class

by
70[?]
in Featured on Dec 22nd, 2014

It was the end of October in 2011, right before Halloween, and I just found out that I had passed the bar exam. I was officially going to be a licensed attorney (the only thing left to do was get sworn in by the Supreme Court of Ohio a few weeks later). It felt amazing. I felt accomplished. All of my hard work had paid off.

Fast forward a few weeks, and I had the exact opposite feeling – fear. I learned that I owed $206,000 in student loan debt. My payments would run close to $2,000 per month. Graduating in 2011, with the legal economy not recovered (and arguably still not recovered), this would be roughly half of my paycheck.

I was an attorney. I was supposed to make bank! Read More

Featured

The 2015 Savings Challenge

by in Personal Finance on Dec 16th, 2014

Last week, Graham from Moneystepper launched the Moneystepper 2015 Savings Challenge where anyone, from anywhere in the world, in whatever financial situation they may be in, is invited to come together and work as a community to accelerate their journey on the path to financial freedom.

To keep things succinct, the key points of the challenge can be summarized as follows:

  1. Everyone strives towards the same two goals. These goals are designed to be appropriate for EVERYONE. They are:
    1. % Increase In Net Wealth
    2. Savings Rate %

These percentages have been designed to be appropriate (and comparable) for everyone: from people paying down mountains of debt to multi-millionaires.

  1. Each participant submits their two percentages before the start of the year, and their progress against their goals each month.
  2. The results are released monthly and everyone will be “grouped” with people who are of a similar net wealth (although participants’ net wealth will never be published) and who have similar goals.

Simple enough, right? But, hugely powerful – believe me! Read More

My 4-Month Experiment Not Using A Comment System – Was It Effective?

by in Lifestyle on Dec 4th, 2014

On June 2nd of this year, my inbox pulled in an email with a link to an article with this headline: “Your Comment System Is Killing Your Discussions and Community Building Efforts.” I was immediately intrigued for two reasons. One, it was written by Sam for the Yakezie network which I had most recently joined. I love Sam’s writing and the ideas he puts forth so naturally I was going to read.

I also was interested because I was using the DISQUS commenting system on my blog at the time. I had installed that at the very beginning of Luke1428.com after doing some reading about how to monitor the comment section of a blog. DISQUS was promoted in the literature I read as being a system that 1) helped block spam, 2) raised the quality of conversation by weeding out gutter-trash commenters, and 3) provided options for monetization if the user wanted to go that route. Plus it was being used by several well-respected and highly trafficked blogs I was reading at the time. So I thought if it’s good enough for the bigwigs it’s good enough for me.

But I suspected Sam had an ulterior motive for preaching against comment systems. A few weeks prior to his post, we had an email exchange one day because he couldn’t log on to DISQUS at my site and make a comment on one of my posts. After several emails we eventually got it worked out and he left a comment. But I was frustrated one of my users had to go through that mess just to comment and I’m sure he was a tiny bit annoyed as well.

So I figured when I clicked to read the article that DISQUS and all other third party comment systems would be skewered. I was right.

In general, Sam’s main argument for abandoning comment systems is that they put up a wall to engagement in that a potential user has to register with the system to comment. They must keep track of their username and password at all times if they want to join the discussion. Many people will balk at that request, refuse to comment and thus the discussion and community building efforts are hindered.

Sam admitted to me in response to my comment on that post that his observations were anecdotal, based solely on his own experience. So I decided to run an experiment to put some data behind his observations. Perhaps then I could find out if DISQUS had actually been hurting my community building efforts.

On July 12th, I scrapped my DISQUS commenting system in favor of the traditional WordPress commenting platform. All the original comments transferred over without problem. The only addition I made to the system was adding the CommentLuv plugin, which allows other bloggers to leave a link to their most recent post when they comment on your article. Read More

How To Create A Successful Blog: Don’t Ask For Too Much Too Soon

Giving Up Too Soon Is Like Asking For Too Much Too Soon

by in Lifestyle on Nov 25th, 2014

As bloggers, we know how difficult it is to gain the trust of a community. Way too many sites start off with a lot of enthusiasm and just fade within a year. Life gets in the way, and that’s fine. There are certainly more important things to do with one’s time than write all day. But for those of you who are serious about blogging, commitment and longevity is a must.

I no longer watch any TV shows live because the networks tend to cancel them arbitrarily mid-season without even an apology or excuse. After spending hours getting into the characters and story, to have a show ripped out from under me pisses me off. I feel like I ended up wasting a lot of time that could be spent doing something else. Now I only watch shows on DVD or Netflix after they’ve survived a third season. Three seasons is enough time for me to invest in the program.

The same thing goes with blogging. A lot of readers don’t fully invest their time on new sites. They know the survival rate for surviving past the 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 3 years mark goes down at each step. Therefore, it is imperative for bloggers who want to make their sites more than just hobbies to survive for at least the first year. Otherwise, readers will tend to just stick with sites that have been around for years, despite having less interesting content. The Yakezie Challenge is six months long b/c it weeds out less serious contenders.

If you are a blogger looking to make connections with other bloggers, the same thing holds true about the importance of survival. Are you really going to bother spending a similar amount of time leaving comments and building a relationship if there’s a high chance the blog will fail? Of course not.

Giving up too soon is one of the top three reasons why sites fail. The other reason is simply unoriginal, unhelpful, uninteresting content. Write Whale Posts if you can instead. Let me discuss more about the third reason why so many sites fail. Read More

How To Make Money Quitting Your Job
  • Barbara Friedberg: Hi Sam, I really enjoyed your encouraging article. Personally, two of the greatest opportunities...
  • Financial Samurai: Good luck on the new adventure! No better way to learn than to actually do, screw up, learn, and...
  • Financial Samurai: Don’t be scared Eric! There is so much opportunity out there, with decent pay nowadays.
  • Untemplater: Lots of opportunity out there, that’s for sure. Blogging has certainly taught me a lot of skills I...
  • Eric - PersonalProfitability.com: Great post Sam. I’ve toyed with the idea of moving from finance to a digital...
  • LaTisha @YoungFinances: Welcome! I can definitely relate to the student debt issue and graduating into a rough...
  • Financial Samurai: Right on Derek. I’m not sure many bloggers who’ve been around know their worth or true...
  • Derek@LifeAndMyFinances: When I saw this article come through, I absolutely loved it and read it in its entirety on...
  • Barbara Friedberg: Hi Will, Thanks for taking the time to weigh in on this important issue. That is exactly why I...
  • Financial Samurai: Sharing an e-mail from Jacob: Although we probably can’t afford $200,000 a year for a...
China Wholesale

Help Support The Yakezie Network

Yakezie Membership Support
Yakezie.com

© 2015 Yakezie.com | All Rights Reserved

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Contact Yakezie

Personal Finance Lifestyle Writing Contest

The Yakezie is one of world's largest and most sophisticated network of personal finance and lifestyle bloggers. Through collaboration and the selfless support of others, we strive to improve the lives of every one of our visitors.

About Yakezie